Denim Lemonade: A poem by Henry Goldkamp

By Henry Goldkamp

[i]denim lemonade \ˈde-nəm le-mə-ˈnād\ noun [origin unknown](1956)
1 : an extravagant, often loud spiel of determined work ethic, when in actuality little is being worked upon : PALAVER
2 : any beverage sipped while motivating denim lemonade, usually leading to insobriety (1) <Just one more denim lemonade wouldn’t hurt, would it?>
3 : any light emanating from a screen, often confused for godliness or splendor; SEE ALSO: EFFULGENCE, HALATION
4 : any wet putrescence such as froth, scum, mold, or similar rot due to neglect or lack of use
5: a shrine of post-modernity; also : a couch
6: a liquid scourge of insobriety, especially: inaction leading up to denim lemonade
6: something suggestive of a gaping maw <denim lemonade goes down my denim lemonade real easy>
          usage see EDENTATE

[ii]denim lemonade verb –naded; -nading (2016)
transitive verb
1 : to catch natural sound by way of an individual tongue : BABBLE, YELP
2 : to use a foreign body as a prop without explanation
3 : to slander without notion of guttural consequences
intransitive verb
1 : to break a beer bottle out of habit <I want the kind of love that denim lemonades>
2 : to invite entropy to take course by way of snooze button
3 : to believe something of use is beneath one’s floorboards without running to Home Depot for a prybar, without wedging the metal in the soft spot, without dreaming what a century-old mustard glass consists of, without praying for what it might hold

      — denim lemonader noun
      — denim lemonadeness noun
      — denim lemonadely adverb


Goldkamp lives in Saint Louis / New Orleans / the spirit of gratitude. He likes spreading it around / realizing how damn lucky this is. He has recent work in Mudfish / Hoot / Seems / dryland / The Harpoon Review / Straylight / others. His art has been covered by the Post-Dispatch / Time / NPR / more. To read up on / about these things, google:henry goldkamp with a fresh drink of your choice.

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